e-News - December 6, 2011

E-News - December 6, 2011

CEECD / SKC-ECD: WHAT’S NEW?

 

The Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development keeps on growing and updating its content! 

With now 47 topics, and counting, the Encyclopedia is a significant resource for anyone with an interest in early childhood. Over 450 experts from 45 countries have already contributed to this free online source of national and international research on the development of young children.

Three new topics

Emotions
Emotional development in infancy and early childhood is important for several interrelated skills. Emotional understanding, in turn, allows children to monitor and to modify their emotions in order to cope with difficult situations.


To learn more, consult the complete folder on Emotions.

 

Divorce and separation
The effects of divorce and separation may be particularly important for children under 4 as rapid developmental changes in the cognitive, emotional and social domains take place in early childhood.


To learn more, consult the complete folder on Divorce and separation.
  

Immigration
Immigrant children’s integration is also driven by their desire to be accepted by their peers. By forming friendships with children of the mainstream culture, immigrant children learn and adopt the customs and socio-cultural values of the mainstream society.

To learn more, consult the complete folder on Immigration.

These three new topics were developed thanks to the financial contributions of The Lawson Foundation (Divorce/separation), the Margaret & Wallace McCain Family Foundation (Emotions) and the Alberta Centre for Child, Family & Community Research (Immigration).

Two updated topics

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)
Despite its entirely preventable nature, prenatal alcohol exposure remains the leading cause of congenital abnormalities, intellectual impairment, and other developmental problems in children.

To learn more, consult the complete folder on FASD.


Stress (prenatal and perinatal)
There is a consistent belief across cultures that maternal stress can have a negative effect on the development of the fetus, baby, and child. This is particularly important given the high levels of daily stress reported by women of childbearing age.

To learn more, consult the complete folder on Stress (prenatal and perinatal).

 

 
             
 

 

LAST UPDATE: 2017-10-18